July, 2017

Wrap up July with books from Edwidge Danticat, Elena Ferrante, and more

by Anjali Enjeti | Jul-24-2017

NBCC board member Tom Beer summarizes this week's new books for Newsday.

NBCC board member Mary Ann Gwinn reviewed Richard Laurie's "Putin: His Downfall and Russia's Coming Crash," Fred Kaplan's “Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War,” and Flip Springer's “History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish Town,” for the Seattle Times.

David Cooper reviewed Joshua Cohen's "Moving Kings," for the New York Journal of Books. 

Carolyn Kellogg wrapped up the week in books for the Los Angeles Times. 

Leah Mirakhor reviewed Edwidge Danticat's "The Art of Death," for the Los Angeles Times. 

Pricilla Gilman reviewed Samantha Hunt's "The Dark, Dark," for the Boston Globe.

Meredith Maren reviewed Julie Klam's "The Stars in Our Eyes," for the Chicago Tribune.

Heller McAlphin reviewed Tamara Shopsin's "Arbitrary Stupid Goal," for NPR.

Jonathan Russell Clark reviewed Gabe Habash's "Stephen Florida," for the New York Times. 

Paul Wilner reviewed Ann Beattie's "The Accomplished Guest," for ZYZZYVA. 

Carmela Ciurara reviewed Andrew Sean Greer's "Less" for the San Francisco Chronicle. 

Maureen Corrigan discussed Lynn Reed's "The Last Laugh" and Matthew Klam's "Who is Rich?" on NPR and reviewed Ruth Ware's, "The Lying Game" for the Washington Post.

Rayyan Al-Shawaf reviewed Bianca Marais' "Hum If You Don't Know The Words," for the Toronto Star. 

For the San Francisco Chronicle, Joan Frank reviewed Jesse Chaffee's "Florence in Ecstacy."

Natalie Bakopoulos reviewed Elena Ferrante's "Frantumaglia," translated by Ann Goldstein, for The Kenyon Review.

Joe Peschel reviewed Jesús Carrasco's "Out in the Open," for the Raleigh News and Observer. 

For The London Magazine, Hélène Cardona reviewed Stephen Yenser's "Stone Fruit."

Hamilton Cain reviewed Mary Gordon's "There Your Heart Lies," for Oprah magazine. 

And in other news:

NBCC board member Michele Filgate wrote about the new female Dr. Who for CNN.

Winner of the NBCC award for her poetry collection, "Elegy," Mary Jo Bang published a poem, "The Chess Set on a Table Between Two Chairs," in the New York Times. 

NBCC Balakian winner Michael Gorra previewed "Henry James and American Painting," at the The Morgan Library and Museum for the New York Review of Books. 

Your reviews seed this roundup. Please send items, including news about your new publications and recent honors, to NBCCCritics@gmail.com. Make sure to send links that do not require a subscription or username and password. Please include your name, the publication, a description of your article, and a URL. We love URLs. We do not love hyperlinks.


Anjali Enjeti's reviews and essays about books have appeared in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, the Star Tribune, The Guardian, Literary Hub, Atlanta magazine and elsewhere. She teaches creative nonfiction in the Etowah Valley MFA program at Reinhardt University.

NBCC/Zyzzyva Party in San Francisco July 24

by Admin | Jul-17-2017

Coming up: 

The seventh annual National Book Critics Circle/Zyzzyva cocktail party, hosted by NBCC VP and former President Jane Ciabattari and Zyzzyva's Editor in Chief Laura Cogan and Managing Editor (and former NBCC board member) Oscar Villalon. Join us for toasts--including our new emerging critics program--and literary conversation.

When: Monday, July 24, at 6 pm.

Where: The Mechanics Institute building, 57 Post Street, Suite 604, San Francisco, CA

RSVP: janeciab@gmail.com


Books for runners, books for readers, books for summer

by Laurie Hertzel | Jul-17-2017

NBCC vice president/ online Jane Ciabattari's Lit Hub column features It Girl Eve Babitz's first novel, redux; 2000 literary It Guy Matthew Klam's first novel, Nina Rigg's radiant cancer memoir and Diksha Basu's first novel, set in her hometown, Delhi.  

NBCC board member and autobiography chair Laurie Hertzel reviewed “The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen Age 83 ¼,” by an anonymous Dutch writer, for the Minneapolis Star Tribune. She also wrote her weekly Bookmark column for the Strib on "ten tips to pack more reading into your day."

Joan Frank reviewed "The Use of Fame" by Cornelia Nixon, for the San Francisco Chronicle and Sylvia Brownrigg's "Pages for Her,"  also for the Chronicle.

Parul Kapur Hinzen interviewed Geeta Kothari, author of "I Brake for Moose and Other Stories," for The Rumpus.

Mike Lindgren wrote about "The Card Catalog" for the Washington Post. (Many people commented.)

Lanie Tankard reviewed Lisa Ko's "The Leavers" for The Woven Tale Press.

Scott F. Parker wrote about four summer reads about running for Runner's World. (Can one read and run at the same time?)

Balakian award winning critic Parul Sehgal praises Daphne du Maurier for the New York Times.

Joseph Peschel reviews "Why: What Makes Us Curious," by Mario Livio, for Science Magazine.

Your reviews seed this roundup. Please send items, including news about your new publications and recent honors, to NBCCCritics@gmail.com. Make sure to send links that do not require a subscription or username and password. Please include your name, the publication, a description of your article, and a URL. We love URLs. We do not love hyperlinks.


Laurie Hertzel is the senior editor for books at the Minneapolis Star Tribune and a member of the NBCC board.

Summer heats up with hot new memoirs from Sherman Alexie, David Sedaris, and more

by Anjali Enjeti | Jul-10-2017

 

NBCC President Kate Tuttle interviewed Ben Mezrich, the author of “Woolly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive One of History’s Most Iconic Extinct Creatures,” and reviewed Margot Livesey’s “The Hidden Machinery: Essays on Writing,” for the Boston Globe.

VP/Online Jane Ciabattari's Lit Hub column features reviews by former NBCC board members Laura Miller and Lev Grossman, Balakian winner Carlos Lozada, an interview with Sherman Alexie by former board member Mary Ann Gwinn. At the BBC, she features the best beach reads for 2017

NBCC Balakian award-winning critic Carlos Lozada reviews Roy L. Brooks's "The Racial Glass Ceiling" for the Washington Post.

NBCC Balakian award-winning critic Michelle Dean reviewed Eve Babitz’s’ “Sex and Rage,” for the Los Angeles TImes.

NBCC Balakian award-winning critic Parul Sehgal reviewed Arundati Roy’s “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness,” for The Atlantic.

NBCC award finalist (and former board member) Benjamin Moser wrote about whether grants or professorships help or hurt writers for the New York Times.

NBCC board member Anjali Enjeti was profiled in Khabar magazine, and reviewed Gin Phillips’ “Fierce Kingdom” for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

NBCC board member Katherine A. Powers reviewed the audio books for Tessa Hadley’s “Bad Dreams and Other Stories,” Sigrid Undset’s “Kristin Lavransdatter,” and David Sedaris’ “Diaries,” for the Washington Post.

NBCC board member Laurie Hertzel wrote about how to be a more productive reader for the Star Tribune.

Former NBCC board member Mark Athitakis reviews Brian Platzer’s “Bed-Stuy is Burning,” for the Star Tribune and Joshua Cohen’s “Moving Kings,” for the Los Angeles Times.

Michael Lindgren reviewed "The Education of Henry Adams: An Autobiography," with an introduction by Edmund Morris, for The Millions.

Lisa Spaar wrote about Emilia Phillips’ “Groundspeed” and Olga Broumas’ “Soie Sauvage,” for the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Colette Bancroft reviewed Mark Bowden's "Hue 1968," for the Tampa Bay Times.

Joseph Peschel reviewed Curtis Hawkins’ “The Graybar Hotel,” for the Houston Chronicle.

Maureen Corrigan reviewed Nick Laird’s “Modern Gods,” for NPR.

Heller McAlpin reviewed Madeline Blais’ “To the New Owners,” for the Washington Post and Ashley Shelby’s “South Pole Station,” for NPR.

Rayyan Al-Shawaf reviewed Omar Robert Hamilton’s “The City Always Wins,” in the Los Angeles Times. 

Soniah Kamal reviewed Arundhati Roy’s “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness,” for Khabar and recently gave a TedX talk about regrets, second chances, and pursuing dreams.

Jennifer Yacovissi reviewed Al Franken’s "Giant of the Senate," and wrote a column about the quality of seasoned authors’ books for the Washington Independent Review of Books.

 

Your reviews seed this roundup. Please send items, including news about your new publications and recent honors, to NBCCCritics@gmail.com. Make sure to send links that do not require a subscription or username and password. Please include your name, the publication, a description of your article, and a URL. We love URLs. We do not love hyperlinks.


Anjali Enjeti is a freelance critic, essayist and journalist. Her work has appeared in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, the Star Tribune, Vice, NPR, NBC, The Guardian, Washington Post, the New York Times, and elsewhere. She lives near Atlanta, teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Reinhardt University, and can be found on Twitter @anjalienjeti. Her current term on the NBCC Board ends in 2020.

GONE FISHING

by Admin | Jul-04-2017


June, 2017

Critical Notes: Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich, Sherman Alexie, and more

by Michele Filgate | Jun-26-2017

NBCC president Kate Tuttle reviews Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s “The Fact of a Body” for the Los Angeles Times.

Former NBCC board member Eric Liebetrau and current NBCC president Kate Tuttle contributed to The Boston Globe’s summer reading feature.

NBCC board member Anjali Enjeti reviews Nina Riggs’ debut memoir, “The Bright Hour,” for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

NBCC Balakian winner Parul Sehgal reviews Arundhati Roy’s “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness” for The Atlantic. Anita Felicelli reviews the same book for the Los Angeles Review of Books.

NBCC Emerging Critics Fellow Heather Scott Partington reviews “Four New Collections of Omnivorous Literary Criticism” for the New York Times.

Joseph Peschel reviews Kathleen Flynn’s “Jane Austen Project” for the News & Observer and The Charlotte Observer.

Priscilla Gilman reviews Sherman Alexie’s “You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me” in the Boston Globe.

Steven G. Kellman reviews J. Robert Lennon’s “Broken River” for the San Francisco Chronicle, and has an essay on Jhumpa Lahiri writing in Italian in the New England Review.

Lisa Guidarini has joined the Glasgow Review of Books as a reviewer and essayist.

For The Jewish Week's summer books section, Erika Dreifus reviews Dorit Rabinyan's “All the Rivers,” translated by Jessica Cohen.

Jake Marmer reviews David Shapiro’s “In Memory of an Angel” for Tablet Magazine.

Robert Birnbaum suggests some books for summer reading.

Michael Berry reviews “The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter” by Theodora Goss for the Portland Press Herald.

Jeffrey Ann Goudie reviewed Angelica Baker’s debut novel, “Our Little Racket,” for the Kansas City Star

Joan Silverman reviews “The Girl of the Lake” by Bill Roorbach for the Portland Press Herald.

Your reviews seed this roundup. Please send items, including news about your new publications and recent honors, to NBCCCritics@gmail.com. Make sure to send links that do not require a subscription or username and password. Please include your name, the publication, a description of your article, and a URL. We love URLs. We do not love hyperlinks.


Michele Filgate is a contributing editor at Literary Hub and a freelance writer, essayist, and critic. Her work has appeared in The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, O The Oprah Magazine, The Barnes & Noble Review, and many other publications. She teaches creative nonfiction for The Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop and Catapult and lives in Brooklyn.

Summer solstice ushers in reviews of highly anticipated books by Arundhati Roy and Roxane Gay

by Anjali Enjeti | Jun-19-2017

Reviews and interviews:

This week on Lit Hub, Jane Ciabattari, NBCC VP/Online, focused on the new Arundhati Roy and Catherine Lacey novels, an anthology edited by Ayelet Waldman and Michael Chabon called “Kingdom of Olives and Ash,” and more.She also captures the Bay Area Book Festival in four acts.

NBCC board member Mary Ann Gwinn interviews Sherman Alexie for The Seattle Times about his new memoir, “You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me.”

NBCC board member Colette Bancroft reviews Roxane Gay's memoir "Hunger" and Arundati Roy’s "The Ministry of Utmost Happiness for the Tampa Bay Times.

NBCC board member Tom Beer reviews Arundhati Roy's “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness” for Newsday.

NBCC board member Anjali Enjeti reviews Scott Gould’s “Strangers to Temptation” for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, and Arundhati Roy’s “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness” and Camille T. Dungy’s “Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood, and History” for the Star Tribune.

Former NBCC board member Mark Athitakis reviews Don Lee’s “Lonesome Lies Before Us” for the Washington Post.

Rayyan Al-Shawaf reviews Arundhati Roy’s “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness” for San Antonio Express-News.

Karen Long reviews Roxane Gay’s “Hunger” for Newsday.

Joan Silverman reviews Ann Beattie’s “The Accomplished Guest” for the Portland Press Herald.

Carol Iacofano reviews Joseph Finder's "The Switch," Scott Turow's "Testimony" and Ben Coes' "Trap the Devil" for WBUR, as well as Elizabeth Strout's "Anything is Possible" for WBUR.

Lanie Tankard reviews "The Tower of the Antilles" by Achy Obejas for The Woven Tale Press. 

Laverne Frith reviews  Charles Simic's "Scribbled in the Dark" for the New York Journal of Books. 

V. Joshua Adams reviews “First Thought: Conversations with Allen Ginsberg,” edited by Michael Schumaker for PopMatters.

Dianne Scharper reviews "All the Rivers" by Dorit Rabinyan for The Weekly Standard. 

Maureen Corrigan reviews Maile Meloy’s “Do Not Be Alarmed” for NPR. 

Carl Rollyson reviews Mary V. Dearborn’s “Ernest Hemingway: A Biography” for the San Francisco Chronicle.

For Slate, Ismail Muhammad reviews Teju Cole’s book of photography, “Blind Spot.”

For The Millions, David Nilsen reviews “Priestdaddy” by Patricia Lockwood.

Meg Waite Clayton reviews “Caught in the Revolution: Petrograd, Russia, 1917 – A World on the Edge,” by Helen Rapport for the San Francisco Chronicle. 

Marcie Geffner interviews author Lee Daniel Kravetz about his book, “Strange Contagion.”

And in other exciting booknews:

Author of the NBCC-award winning “The Lost,” Daniel Mendelsohn, has a forthcoming memoir, “An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic” that will be published in September.

Critic Maureen Corrigan was the featured critic in Ploughshares, “The Readers Series.”

NBCC award-winning author Leanne Shapton’s new book, “Was She Pretty,” was reviewed in Pop Matters. 

Your reviews seed this roundup. Please send items, including news about your new publications and recent honors, to NBCCCritics@gmail.com. Make sure to send links that do not require a subscription or username and password. Please include your name, the publication, a description of your article, and a URL. We love URLs. We do not love hyperlinks.


Anjali Enjeti is a freelance critic, essayist and journalist. Her work has appeared in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, the Star Tribune, Vice, NPR, NBC, The Guardian, Washington Post, the New York Times, and elsewhere. She lives near Atlanta, teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Reinhardt University, and can be found on Twitter @anjalienjeti.

Page 1 of 335 pages     1 2 3 >  Last ›


About the Critical Mass Blog

Commentary on literary criticism, publishing, writing, and all things NBCC related. It's written by independent members of the NBCC Board of Directors (see list of bloggers below).

Subscribe

SIGN UP FOR CRITICAL NOTES





Categories & Archives

Become a Friend of the NBCC

NBCC Awards

Award Winners for 2016

See all award winners

Find out how to submit

Read how we select

Frequently Asked Questions


Videos and Podcasts

NBCC 2016 Awards Ceremony

NBCC 2015 Awards Ceremony

NBCC 2015 Finalists Reading

NBCC 2014 Awards Ceremony

NBCC 2013 Awards Ceremony

NBCC 2013 Finalists Reading

Video: New Literary Journals

Video: The VIDA Count and Gender Bias in Book Reviewing

Podcast: What Is Criticism? NBCC Winners and Finalists at AWP

All videos and podcasts.



The postings on this blog represent the views and opinions of each individual poster and are not representative of views held by the National Book Critics Circle as an organization, or the NBCC board as a whole. Everything on this blog is copyright protected

Online Committee


Links